Saturday, March 18

young at heart

The picture above is of my granddaughter Alice May, who at only 3 months of age clearly indicates an enquiring expression. It reminds me of the miracle of new life and how privileged we are in this country to possibly enjoy a long life. In fact our longevity is increasing to the extent that middle age for many extends to 80 years of age. Charles Kovess 2nd passion point has some useful tips for staying young at heart and in mind. I have reproduced it below.

A Passion Point to Ponder 8 March 2006.

Welcome to the 2nd Passion Point for 2006. Our goal with these Passion Points continues to be to provoke you so that your business, and the rest of your life, become filled with more passion, performance, and improved balance of mental, physical, and spiritual elements. A special welcome to the many new subscribers who have recently joined our passionate community.

RETHINK YOUR ATTITUDE TO AGEING WITH THIS 7 POINT PLAN”
It's official--old age has been postponed. In a speech to the 2005 British Association Science Conference, Professor Ian Robertson, Dean of Research at Trinity College Dublin Institute of Neuroscience, told his audience that old age now begins at 80. "This leaves 30 years-roughly between 50 and 80, a period much longer than youth-for which we have to invent a whole new way of living." Professor Robertson considers the years between 50 and 80 to be the new prime of life, and 80 the new 60.

Professor Robertson, also known as "The Mind Doctor", and author of several books, has conducted extensive research on the brain, concluding that it is shaped by experience, learning and thinking. Importantly, what we do after turning 50 strongly influences our faculties. Professor Robertson concludes that, with the improvement in health care for the over-50s, "thebiggest remaining obstacle to long life is the fitness of brain and mind". He has formulated a Seven Point Plan to keep the brain young:
1) Aerobic fitness is fundamental to body and mind.The longer you stay fit, the sharper your mindbecomes. Exercise increases key brain chemicals which encourages new growth and development.
2) Mental stimulation, such as doing crosswords or Sudoko, helps grow new brain cells.
3) New learning has profound physiological effects on the brain. Learning should be for life and, as Professor Robertson puts it " The more you learn, the more you can learn."
4) Avoid stress, it can be a major negative, especially on the memory.
5) Diet and nutrition are fundamental-a diet rich in fruit, vegetables and fish has many benefits.
6) Social interaction helps mental sharpness.
7) Thinking young. Thoughts influence behaviour—you are what you think you are.Despite Professor Robertson's evidence, in a recent UK survey, many respondents saw youth beginning at 49 and old age at 60. Unless these people change their thoughts they will follow their views, becoming old at 60.

"As a Man Thinketh" is old wisdom; it is the title of a book by James Allen first published in 1902 but, as Professor Robertson's scientific research demonstrates, wisdom never dates or ages. Whether we are wise depends on how we think--and age.

QUOTES TO CONSIDER"
If you start to think of yourself as old when you are 60, which is no longer justified, you will behave old." Professor Ian Robertson (born 20th century), Dean of Research Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College, Dublin.

What do your thoughts justify; do you just sigh, or try different behaviour?
"As a man thinketh in his heart so is he." James Allen (1864-1912), English author.

In your heart do you start to think anew?
Charles Kovess Australia’s Passion Provocateur © Copyright- Charles B. Kovess & David J. Wood of Passionate Performance. Republication welcome provided authors are acknowledged & advised at above address. If you want to see Charles on video, or listen to audio, just go to www.kovess.com and follow the links.For a list of keynote speech topics that Charles would love to deliver in a passionate, entertaining, provocative, and educational way to your teams, clients, or prospects, at breakfast, lunch or dinner, see below.
All 139 published Passion Points to Ponder are on our website.
If you wish to review them, please visit the site. If you wish to receive a list of the 139 titles of the Passion Points please let us know KEY NOTE SPEECH TOPICS1 PASSIONATE PERFORMANCE: YOUR KEYS TO MENTAL, PHYSICAL & SPIRITUAL WELLBEING IN BUSINESS. 2 THE POWER OF VISIONARY LEADERSHIP3 The 7 Key steps to create Outstanding teams.4 How to retain the best people in your Organisation.5 PASSION: THE KEY TO YOUR SUSTAINABLE COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE IN THE 21ST CENTURY.6 HIGH PERFORMANCE BUSINESS LEADERSHIP IN THE KNOWLEDGE AGE.7 Change: Make it an inspirational game!8 A PASSION FOR LIFE, AND LIVING IT!9 KEY PRINCIPLES OF PERSONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY.10 7 STRATEGIES THAT GUARANTEE LOYALTY FROM EMPLOYEES AND CUSTOMERS.

Best regards from Australia's Passion Provocateur (copyright) Charles Kovess LL.B.(Hons), LL.M., CSP*Immediate Past National PresidentNational Speakers' Association of Australia(*CSP means Certified Speaking Professional, the highest membership category of NSAA and the only internationally recognised designation for professional speakers.)http://www.kovess.com NOTE NEW ADDRESS DETAILS
ph 0395622248 mobile 0412317404 PO Box 1412, Central Park East Malvern Vic 3145 Office: 17 Notre Dame Parade, Mulgrave Vic 3170Author of 'Passionate People Produce' and 'Passionate Performance'Co-author of '7 Heavenly Virtues of Leadership'

8 comments:

madcapmum said...

That's one beautiful little girl!

I've been thinking about this post for the past day or two, and I'm not sure what I think of it all. I mean, it's obviously to be as healthy and active as possible for as long as possible, but it makes me a bit nervous when people start talking about extending lifespan. I'm not quite getting this out the way I want. I think what I'm trying to say is that isn't it okay to get old?

And how much sense does it make to say that old age begins at 80, if in Canada the average lifespan is still 78? Is there going to be an intolerance for people in their late sixties and seventies whose bodies are starting to wear out, because obviously they haven't "done" something right to be hale and hearty until 100? I think of animals, and different species and breeds have different lifespans that are just accepted. Chows (dog breed) live between 7-9 years. An 11 year old Chow is exceptional, not the norm. I'm wondering if this is a trend to try to get the exceptional accepted as standard.

Granny said...

Has it been three months already? Where does the time go.

New photos on granny.

Lindsay Lobe said...

Hi Madcap

I think it’s certainly okay to say we are old. I am reminded of my Mother who nearly died at aged 77. Later before she died in her eighties she remarked to me on several occasions that she should have died naturally earlier, due to the burden of deteriorating heath. The other interesting aspect will be the increased taxation burden for the working population (assuming those in their 60’s and 70’s retire) who will need to fund increased health and pension cost for a growing proportion in the population of retirees.

Best wishes

Gary said...

My God, that little child is filled with light and beauty...



Sow a thought
Reap an action

Sow an action
Reap a behviour

Sow a behaviour
Reap a habit

So a habit
Reap a character

Sow a character
Reap a destiny.

Gary (55 years young this year!)I don't think it's about language, it's about how we live each day and whether we are able to accept what comes our way. Madcapmum will never be old I suspect (even when she's 100).

Lindsay Lobe said...

Hi gary

Very good, Sow as you reap. So your 55 in September ?

Best wishes

Ammey Kesarkar said...

She is soooo Sweeeeeeeeet!

Val said...

Having turned 60 last year and not for once thinking of myself as old, I can really relate to the 7 point plan, much of which I have already implemented. As I'm intending to retire this year it's going to be even more important to maintain a youthful outlook. Thanks for this post!

Lindsay Lobe said...

Hi Val

I am sure you will enjoy your retirement and I look forward to reading about your activities with great interest.