Tuesday, August 2


The Hebrew writers and poets of the OT told stories which embraced myths and were expert story tellers as they attempted to add meaning to their life and culture. The problem is, of course, the writers more often than not made up these stories on the basis they were never intended by their readers to be taken literally or be believed as true events.Rather the intention was to bring fresh insight into their existence and to underpin a philosophy or recipe for living.  One such story suggests undue favouritism, a will to power and redemption are inextricably linked in the very familiar story of Joseph and his coat of many colours.

Here is my poem which attempts to tell the story.  
Blessed by his father’s hands

Always resting at his side.

Envy of his brother’s hearts   

Schemed to end his life.


One brother feared,   

Let not blood stain our hands,

Sell him to slavery, share the spoils.      

Dipped his coat in animal blood.

“Dear father –Joseph now is dead”.


Joseph enslaved. Interpreted dreams.

His fame spread, his council sought.

From Pharaoh’s dream he revealed   

Seven years’ plenty, thence famine be.
Pharaoh to Joseph, be my ruler, he decreed  

Go harvest aplenty, let my silos overflow

Until famine came, just as Joseph foretold  

Food for all nations, across a barren country        

Until famine was his brothers' fate,

Came begging at Josephs feet,

What lesson would Joseph now impart?



susan said...

A beautiful version of a wise story.

Lindsay Byrnes said...

Thanks Susan.