Sunday, April 30

Nothing is certain, only the certain spring."

Charles Kovess’s passion point reminds us of our ANZAC (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps) heritage. Australian troops landed at Gallipoli on the 25th April 1915 and suffered 25,000 casualties, before final evacuation in Dec of that year. Australia had become a Federation in 1901 and the Gallipoli campaign served to create the notion of the ANZAC spirit and our Nations spirit. Ideals of courage, endurance and mateship were etched into a fledgling nation’s consciousness.

It is ironic that the ANZAC spirit arose from an ill conceived battle with its needless defeat and slaughter of innocent blood. The British maps of the landing area were flawed, depicting gentle slopes rather than the steep cliffs, not expecting that landing parties would be wading through deep water where many would drown, and be sitting ducks for Turkish machine gunners. There was a narrow strip of beach then tall cliffs to be scaled to face the Turkish enemy. The fleet could have sailed on further with little Turkish defences to a much easier landing.

The fallen became “They that will not grow old”, our ANZACS, who died for a mother country for another’s war on far off fateful shores. It’s a sobering thought to realise in the Great War of 1914 to 1918 over 300,000 young Australians volunteered to defend what was “Mother England” from a total population of only around 3 million, with 66% either killed or returning incapacitated.

During the 1960s and 1970s numbers attending ANZAC marches fell but the tide of sentiment has turned from the 1990’s to a remarkable resurgence of interest, particularly amongst young people, with many making the pilgrimage to the Gallipoli Peninsula to attend the Dawn Service. Our younger generation wants to learn of this history and to understand how it impacted in their communities. School Children learn of their equivalents then, since many lied about their age (typically only 16) on enlistment. They do the detailed research of the families and where they fell; even some visit their gravesites in Turkey to “live” that history. It becomes very emotional for them, influencing their future lives to the better. It’s as if the ANZAC consciousness urges them to live each moment to the full for "Nothing is certain, only the certain spring."

Included below is his Passion point.

Welcome to the 4th Passion Point for 2006.

Our goal with these Passion Points continues to be to provoke you so that your business, and the rest of your life, become filled with more passion, performance, and improved balance of mental, physical, and spiritual elements. A special welcome to the many new subscribers who have recently joined our passionate community.

MAN’S INNER JOURNEY: A GREAT PROGRAMI attended a great weekend seminar entitled ‘Man’s Inner Journey’ in July 2005. It’s excellent. It’s being repeated in Melbourne on 13 & 14 May 2006. Details are below."DIRECTION THROUGH REFLECTION” A day, a pen and a poem have strong connections.

The 25th of April has special significance forAustralians and New Zealanders, and also for Turks.

It was on 25 April,1915 that Anzac troops landed on the Turkish shore of Gallipoli, shaping history and, arguably, their nations.
23 years later, on 25 April, 1938, theHungarian Laszlo Biro lodged a patent for what is nowthe universal ballpoint pen. Little did Laszlo realisethat his humble invention would soon become aninstrument of war.
The Biro was mass produced inEngland for Second World War RAF navigators to use inunpressurised aircraft cockpits, where fountain pensfailed.
It is on Anzac Day, more than any other, that we pauseto remember those who fell in all wars.
The most quoted memorial words are:

"They shall grow not old, as we that are left growold:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them."

"The Ode", as it is known, is the fourth verse from aseven verse poem
"For the Fallen", by English poet Laurence Binyon.

Although Binyon's 1914 poem predates Anzac Day and the Biro, all are connected through warand history.

It is through reflective times like Anzac Day that we recognise and realise many things--history, respect, and gratitude, are but a few. It is through reflection that we recognise the sacrifice of others towards our uniqueness and our tomorrows.
War, directly or indirectly, still influences us through our freedom. The pen, despite the typewriter and the mouse, still helps record our history. Words, if not always in poetic form, are fundamental to civilisation, education and freedom.
As we pause to reflect this Anzac Day, war and wordswill become inseparable, contributing to our unique, yet shared experiences.

Unlike the fallen, "who grownot old", we will age and, only through our efforts,grow.
Whether we will be remembered is up to us.

QUOTES TO CONSIDER"

I'll choose this moment and keep it, He said to himself, for a vow, To remember for ever and ever As if it were always now."Laurence Binyon (1869-1843), English poet.

Do you vow to use the now to shape your future?
"Nothing is certain, only the certain spring."Laurence Binyon (1869-1843), English poet.

What do you bring to the certain spring; at curtaincall, will few or all, remember what you did?

Have a passion-filled day, week, and month, till our next Passion Point.
Charles Kovess Australia’s Passion Provocateur © Copyright- Charles B. Kovess & David J. Wood of Passionate Performance. Republication welcome provided authors are acknowledged & advised at above address. If you want to see Charles on video, or listen to audio, just go to www.kovess.com and follow the links.

For a list of keynote speech topics that Charles would love to deliver in a passionate, entertaining, provocative, and educational way to your teams, clients, or prospects, at breakfast, lunch or dinner, see below.

All 141 published Passion Points to Ponder are on our website. If you wish to review them, please visit the site. If you wish to receive a list of the 141 titles of the Passion Points please let us know.

MAN’S INNER JOURNEY For Men: How often do you invest in YOU?Commence the journey from your head, to your heart. Discover the tools to improve the way your life works! The Man's Inner Journey Seminar is designed specifically for Men. The workshop offers you a practical blend of information and experience for you to develop insights into the beliefs, attitudes, influences and patterns ofbehaviour that impact (positively and/or negatively) on the quality of your life outcomes. The workshop offers you the tools to change and develop.

The next Man's Inner Journey workshop is on 13 & 14 May 2006 9AM-6PM in Melbourne.For more information visit the website www.mansinnerjourney.com, or send us a REPLY to this email, and we’ll send you some more information.KEY NOTE SPEECH TOPICS
1 PASSIONATE PERFORMANCE: YOUR KEYS TO MENTAL, PHYSICAL & SPIRITUAL WELLBEING IN BUSINESS. 2 THE POWER OF VISIONARY LEADERSHIP 3 The 7 Key steps to create Outstanding teams.4 How to retain the best people in your Organisation.5 PASSION: THE KEY TO YOUR SUSTAINABLE COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE IN THE 21ST CENTURY.6 HIGH PERFORMANCE BUSINESS LEADERSHIP IN THE KNOWLEDGE AGE.7 Change: Make it an inspirational game!8 A PASSION FOR LIFE, AND LIVING IT!9 KEY PRINCIPLES OF PERSONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY.10 7 STRATEGIES THAT GUARANTEE LOYALTY FROM EMPLOYEES AND CUSTOMERS.

Best regards from Australia's Passion ProvocateurCharles Kovess LL.B.(Hons), LL.M., CSP*, MAICD, MAITDPast National President National Speakers' Association of Australia(*CSP means Certified Speaking Professional, the highest membership category of NSAA and the only internationally recognised designation for professional speakers.)

9 comments:

Granny said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Granny said...

If you already read the comment, I sent you an apologetic email. If you haven't read it, I'm glad.

Caught me on a bad day but I should save my ranting for my own blog.

Ann

JuBlue said...

Very interesting post, Lindsay. What do you think of Peter Weir's movie about Gallipolli? I haven't seen it, but always meant to. Then, after he did Master and Commander (one of my very favorites), I thought again about seeing Gallipolli. (He also did Dead Poet's Society, another film I thought was very good).

Wendy A said...

Watched Gollipoli. Very well done flick. I usally can't stand war movies but that was a good one. Excellent post Lindsey!

Rachael Byrnes said...

Great post dad. Mr Kovess must love your support! Just letting you know too that I’ve put some new posts on my blog. I been really busy and haven’t had a chance to for a while. Some new lyrics news you might like the lyrics. The "me myself and I" verse is meant to represent how people are focus on them selves and are trapped in a "bigger, better, faster, more type mentality. It's not suggestion that I take "pills" or that I'm a "whore" as one guy a school thought it meant (just in case that bit might have worried you) read it and your get what I mean!!!

Lindsay Lobe said...

Hi granny

No need to apologise as your comments are they are always most welcome and please feel you can relax while commenting at anytime on my blog.

Apart from that Ann made a valid point ,"What are they marching for?".

I think what's happened is there has been a resurgence of interest, to suspend judgement, and to remember those fateful days as a reminder for young people and indeed all of us to make the most of their
lives.

It's remembered each year as it grows in a spirit of goodwill,as this ANZAC March included for the irst time a Turkish contingent.

So in sense the the tradition acknowledges the senseless nature of war, but the ANZAC spirit is very strong as I mentioned in the posting.

You have the growing number of ordinary schoolchildren, taught by extraordinary
History Teachers,students working part time in supermarkets to save for their journey to go to Turkey,to the gravesites after all of the research ,
to relive those fateful times and share their experiences with their
descendants and family of the fallen upon there return. The stories of
these young people are quite moving as is their keen interest.
Thanks for your comments.

Hi JubLu & Wendy
My wife saw gallipolli, not me, it was very good by all accounts as Peter Weir makes great films.

Hi Rachael-will visit soon.

VB said...

Mark and I went to Gallipoli as part of our honeymoon. We had a turkish guide whose father was killed there. He was amazing. He said that their was great respect between the turks and the aussies even though they were fighting each other. It was very sad yet very moving and it was one of the highlights of our trip

Darryl said...

I read ann comment and i thought oh what a load of bollics but when i thought about it she is perfectly RITE!!!

Darryl said...

GRNNY IS A FUCKEN RENKLY BITCH AND I "HATE" HER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!BITCH